The Permaculture Podcast

    1902 – Fostering a 500 Year Vision with Warren Brush

    In this interview by co-host David Bilbrey, Warren Brush returns to the show to share his work about fostering a vision for the next 500 years. During their time together Warren walks us through the mentorship he’s received, the mentoring he provides, and his own discoveries of how to live a fulfilling life now and for future generations, all told through an interwoven, connected story of self, place, and meaning.

     

    Click here to download the episode. | Open Player in New Window

    You can find Warren’s home, Quail Springs Permaculture, at quailsprings.org. You’ll also find links to many of the other organizations mentioned, and his past interviews on the show, in the resources section below.

    Stepping away from this one I find value in all of what Warren shared with us. That nearly everyone lacks an intact culture. We should create a home to work outward from, before stepping up to international outreach. We can find a sense of place and foster an indigenous spirit in a rural, suburban, or even an urban setting. We need to find a way to process grief in a healthy way.

    Grief occupies my thoughts quite a bit lately. Exploring that emotion, beyond just thing interview with Warren, comes from a recent exchange with a friend, Hi Josh!, about the role of guilt in the destructive choices that we make. How a desire to do the right thing can lead to a crisis of comparison and paralysis where we do nothing at all. Or, worse, to put on blinders and barrel down another way which leads to more harm than if we’d not felt the guilt. Considering the premise of guilt which started the conversation with Josh, I wondered if we can look at guilt as a form of grief; the grief that stems from a lack of agency to care for what we love because of the requirements of the dominant culture and the lack of real, deep, and meaningful community.

    If we could make space for those feelings and express them with others who care about us, through a community, could we move through these paralyzing thoughts more quickly and live fully into our own gifts and create the world we know is possible? Is creating that space, now, in an acknowledged period of transition a way we can heal ourselves and with it our homes, communities, and Earth?

    I’d love to hear your thoughts on this and everything else covered in today’s episode. You can get in touch by calling 717-827-6266, send me an email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com, reach out to David, david@thepermaculturepodcast.com, or dropping something in the mail:

    The Permaculture Podcast
    P.O. Box 16
    Dauphin, PA 17018

    Until the next time, spend each day envisioning your future of the world while taking care of Earth, your self, and each other.

    Resources
    Quail Springs Permaculture
    Sustainable Vocations
    Wilderness Youth Project
    Casitas Valley Farm and Creamery
    True Nature Design
    Technical Operations Performance Support (TOPS) Program
    Resilience Resources (USAID)
    Lush Cosmetics Spring Prize
    Eight Shields
    USAID
    The Smell of Rain on Dust

    Past Interviews
    Profitable Permaculture with Warren Brush
    What Sustains You?

    2 Comments

    1. Amanda KAmanda K
      March 6, 2019    

      Thank you both for a very enlightening conversation. I am really in that boat of feeling that things have been wrong for a long time, but having to go against just about everything I was taught to figure out why. It’s a difficult process, to be sure.

    2. March 9, 2019    

      We are so exited to announce that Warren Brush will be heading the first ever PDC course in Joshua Tree this coming March 31 – April, 14th along with a fantastic line up of local permaculture professionals and more.

      There are still a limited number of places available. Visit https://louharrisonhouse.org/permaculture/ for more information.

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