The Permaculture Podcast

    Episode 1522: What is a Permaculture Teacher Training? with Jude Hobbs

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    My guest for this episode Jude Hobbs.

    Jude runs Cascadia Permaculture, located in Cottage Grove, Oregon, and is a long time permaculture designer and teacher. 2015 is her 15th year offering a Permaculture Teacher Training, and that class forms the basis of our conversation. She shares with us what the course is like, the materials covered, the importance of set and setting, and walks us through the class. As a graduate of this course in 2011 I share some of my memories and how that event, and Jude’s tutelage, influenced my path. Using that as a point of reflection she shares how the class has changed in the four years since, as this is an ever evolving program that expands based on her experiences and new writings on experiential education.

    Jude is also a founding member of PINA: Permaculture Institute of North America. We spend some time at the end of this interview discussing what PINA is, the ways we as permaculture practitioners can benefit from this grass roots oriented professional organization, and how you can connect to learn more or become a member.

    If you would like to take a Teacher Training with Jude there is an upcoming class being offered in cooperation with Beyond Organic Design at The Commons in Brooklyn, New York, from June 24 to June 30, 2015. I am scheduled to be a guest instructor the evening of Sunday June 28. The course is limited to 15 participants and my understanding is that they are reaching capacity quickly so if you are interested sign up now via this link:

    Advanced Course in Permaculture Teacher Training with Jude Hobbs

    You can find out more about Jude and her work at cascadiapermaculture.com.

    Though many years have passed since I took my Teacher Training course with Jude, Andrew, and Rico, the impact of my time spent with them at Jude’s home in 2011 still sits with me. This class lead to the path I am on now with The Plan and seeking to formally study and understand the ways in which to better teach through informal and experiential learning.

    The course also helped me understand that though I am a kinesthetic learner I prefer to present through conversation with only necessary graphics, and generally abhor PowerPoint unless it is absolutely necessary. That changes the way I teach. Rather than mimicking the styles of others, I found a personal approach that I am comfortable with, balanced by knowing and understanding it is not an approach that reaches everyone and requires that I adjust my approach as needed to the audience.

    This course also gave me enough successes to continue to put myself out into the world and start with those small presentations at the local library and see them expand to discussions at the monthly meeting of the county master gardeners, and to set-up an informational table on rain-barrels and vermicomposting at a local nature center and later return there to give an afternoon demonstration on how worms can eat our garbage. This last one really drew in the children and made their parents a bit squeamish, but was still a really fun time. Those opportunities continue to grow, and I count my Teacher Training as one of the transition points to begin really pushing my personal boundaries. I left the course confident enough to do, to put myself out there, and to be more to myself and the permaculture community than I thought was possible.

    Though quite a bit dated at this point, I’ve included a link to my original review of the teacher training in the show notes that you can listen to my first impressions shortly after completing the class.

    If there is any way I can help you with your permaculture education, please let me know how I can be of service.

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    Until the next time, take care of Earth, your self, and each other.

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