Nov 242014
 
 

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My guest for this episode is John Arbuckle, a Missouri farmer who is transitioning from grain based pork production to perennial pasture and forage.

John and I discuss talk about his life as a farmer and how he is transitioning away from a grain based diet for his hogs towards developing perennial forages. Familiar with permaculture, he uses tiered priorities to describe his zone model of production, which influences how he interacts with the land. To establish this kind of system John also takes a long view of this work, looking out twenty years in order to reasonably move from the current model to something perennial and permanent.

You can find out more about John and his products at: BaconSnackSticks.com
Singing Prairie Farm (Facebook)

Commentary
Before we get to my commentary, I do want to add that John said to me, after we recorded the interview and were wrapping up, he is trying to get President Obama to pardon one of his turkeys this year for the presidential turkey pardon. If anyone out there has a connection and can help make that happen, I’d really appreciate it.

The first lesson comes from John’s experimentation to see what works and then bolstering his findings with evidence. He saw a problem, found a solution, and is now expanding on it further. This adds to what we know and can use when talking about why permaculture, perennial polycultures, and agroforestry matter. More of this work needs done. Are you currently practicing citizen science and experimenting on matters of permaculture from alternative energy to animal husbandry to landscape techniques?

The other is that we should, as Bill Mollison implores us, take responsibility for our lives and that of our descendants. John reminds us that time is marching on whether we act on our dreams or not. Whether we plant a tree today, tomorrow, or never, time and the world continue with us or without us. I practice permaculture to create the world where I want to live. That world is an abundant one for all life. What world do you want to live in? What are you doing each day to make that world a reality?

Support the Podcast
I am in fundraising mode this fall and need your help to get 2015 off to a good start. If you are in a place where you have some financial surplus in your life, please consider making a one time or monthly contribution to the show. Find out how at: <a href=”http://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/support/”>www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/support</a>

Get In Touch

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Phone: 717-827-6266

The Permaculture Podcast with Scott Mann
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

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 Posted by at 09:00
Nov 182014
 
 

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This episode is the keynote address from Lester Brown delivered at CHABACON 2014, held on October 11th, in Bridgeton, NJ.

The keynote begins with Dr. Michael Edelstein, Director of the Institute for Environmental Studies at Ramapo College of New Jersey. Dr. Edelstein provides an introduction with Mr. Brown’s biography and background and how Lester came to do what he’s doing. Then Mr. Brown takes the stage to discuss the state of agriculture in the world and provides three policies that can address these issues. We then end with a series of audience questions.

 

 

Thank You
I would like to thank Flavia Alaya and Fr. David Rivera for their invitation to cover this event. I’d also like to thank Mr. James Boner and his A/V Club students at Bridgeton High School, Andrea, Angel, and Reggi, for the connection to the sound booth equipment and allowing me to share the space with them for the day.

Thanks also to all the listeners who contribute to the show who make recordings like this possible via their one-time donations or ongoing monthly subscriptions. Find out how at www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/support.

Get In Touch
E-mail: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Phone: 717-827-6266

The Permaculture Podcast with Scott Mann
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Facebook: Facebook.com/ThePermaculturePodcast
Twitter: @permaculturecst
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 Posted by at 23:48
Nov 122014
 
 

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My guest for this episode is Trish Wright, a recent permaculture design certificate graduate developing an urban Food Forest in Roanoke, Virginia. We recorded this conversation in-person as part of my visit to the area.

When Trish contacted me about her work I wanted to interview her and see her project because she is practicing urban permaculture. With more than half of people worldwide living in cities we need to see and understand the examples of what works where people are. Let’s go there and practice.

In additional to that city piece, I also wanted to talk with Trish because she’s relatively new to permaculture and has a different perspective from many of the guests who have devoted years to this material through the practices of design, teaching, or authoring books on the subject. May her voice inspire those of you who are just discovering this system of design to go out there and get your hands dirty. For those of you who have done this for a while, what about going out to explore and try something different. Start a new guild you’ve never thought of before. Tear up an old design and put a new one on paper.

Some things that stand out from this conversation are about how much you can do with not a lot of space. Two-thousand square feet, what Trish originally started with, is less than 1/20th of an acre, yet she has dozens of species of plants there useful to her and the wildlife, and is developing several guilds to expand and integrate into the forest garden.

With wildlife, she’s also planting for other species, such as food for her groundhog, pollinator plants for the pollinators, and also water features for birds, snakes, and amphibians. We work with nature rather than against it and can do a lot of good in our designs by including such things, and expands the system to have more yields even if they don’t appear to benefit us directly by producing food or meeting a human need.

Finally, I did a lot of what Trish did to gain experience early on volunteering for more experience. If you’re interested in hanging out a sign and doing design, spend a few years working on designs for others whatever chance you get. Here Trish is doing work with the Goodwill and a farm. I worked with a church, and a local non-profit. I’ve had people contact me with questions through Facebook. An old friend of mine, a single father with six children, has been consulting with me via text messages.

There are many people who want this information and your help so ask around. Put yourself out there. Tell people what you are doing and you’ll get the assignments you need to help build your portfolio of permaculture design work.

If there is any way I can help you get in touch with local groups or organizations to help you get started, let me know. I’m here to help you create a better world, every day.

Our Sponsor
I’d like to thank Jen Mendez at Permiekids.com for her ongoing sponsorship of the program. We continue to have a dialog about bridging the gap between children and adult learners in education and permaculture. Find out more about her work at permiekids.com. There you will also find information about her series of Edge Alliance webinars, as well as her Educational Design Course.

Support the Podcast
I am in fundraising mode this fall and need your help to get 2015 off to a good start. If you are in a place where you have some financial surplus in your life, please consider making a one time or monthly contribution to the show. Find out how at: www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/support

Get In Touch
E-mail: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Phone: 717-827-6266

The Permaculture Podcast with Scott Mann
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Facebook: Facebook.com/ThePermaculturePodcast
Twitter: @permaculturecst
YouTube

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 Posted by at 12:00
Nov 032014
 
 

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My guest for this episode is Dr. Amanda Poole an Environmental Anthropology professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

During our conversation today Dr. Poole and I discuss her work with students in partnering with the Indiana Community Gardens to create a community development site. That work includes activities like seed swaps or the growing of culturally significant flowers, to language development for foreign born students. Like the conversation with Brad Ward about international development, I consider this interview important for all the ways we can engage using permaculture through culturally relevant means, all without needing to mention P-word. We can engage people directly where they are, and indirectly introduce the ideas and concepts of ecological design and permaculture. This provides a context for the work we do, because that context matters and allows people to see examples of what we are doing, and in turn understand that design, permaculture, and community development all have a place in creating the world we want to live in.

The work of Dr. Poole and her students at the Indiana Community Gardens provide one such model for that.

As an educator, with an environmental ed background, one of the things that I like about what she’s doing is that it provides a hands-on multi-discipline approach to learning. Here students are able to take what they are learning in the class room, share it with others, and see the direct impacts of this kind of work.

I like that it’s more than just a narrow niche to focus on, but broadly based in the community. David Holmgren and others have said that permaculture wasn’t about just design and teaching, but much much more. Chapter fourteen of the Designers’ Manual is the same way. Let’s take what we know, let’s take what we’re good at, and bring it forth into the world in a way that cares for the world that we live in, for all life, and in a way that shares the surplus freely.

If this is something you are doing already or would like help getting started with, I’m here to help. If I don’t have an answer, I know plenty of people in the community who do. Together we can work to create a better world, by design.

Resources
Dr. Amanda Poole
Indiana Community Gardens
Indiana University of Pennsylvania
The Appalachian Teaching Project
Julian StewardCultural Ecology

Thank You To Our Sponsor
I’d like to thank Jen Mendez at Permiekids.com for her ongoing sponsorship of the program. We continue to have a dialog about bridging the gap between children and adult learners in education and permaculture. Find out more about her work at permiekids.com. There you will also find information about her series of Edge Alliance webinars, as well as her Educational Design Course.

Support the Podcast
I am in fundraising mode this fall and need your help to get 2015 off to a good start. If you are in a place where you have some financial surplus in your life, please consider making a one time or monthly contribution to the show. Find out how at: www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/support

Get In Touch
E-mail: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Phone: 717-827-6266

The Permaculture Podcast with Scott Mann
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Facebook: Facebook.com/ThePermaculturePodcast
Twitter: @permaculturecst
YouTube

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 Posted by at 09:00
Oct 292014
 
 

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My guest for this episode is Carol Sanford, author of The Responsible Business and her latest book The Responsible Entrepreneur.  She also mentors permaculture practitioners, such as Ethan Roland of Appleseed Permaculture and the Regenesis Group, to connect our work with business world.

Along the way today we talk about her background as a university professor, and in business development for large companies. We also discuss metrics, principles, social structures, and many other topics that lead to a way to find the essence of our work. This essence is more than what we do, and is bigger than ourselves.

We also talk about hierarchy, anarchy, and responsibility, as well as mechanistic systems, the human potential movement, and living systems. This is a fast paced, dynamic conversation. Relax and hold on, there is a lot of information here and it’s worth your time whether or not you currently operate a permaculture or other business, because these seeds of thought are useful in finding and refining your niche.

You can find Carol and her work at CarolSanford.com.

What stood out to me in this conversation is the role we can have as educators and also in finding our own essence.

As educators we can draw out the ideas that guide someone and help them to discover their best practices. What works best for them?  What matters? What matters is what we then make time for. Tying that to responsibility can allow leaders to get more done in a way that benefits earth, themselves, and everyone else.

That idea of essence is important to me because it’s something I’ve been working through as your host of this show. What is core to what I do? What is it that is bigger than myself that I enjoy so much about this? For a long time I thought it was about the interviews and the information, but the more I do this the more it’s about helping you on your path by making connections to different people and resources, and using my social capital to do so. I want you to find your niche and I’m hear to help you do that, and to bring your vision of permaculture and regenerative practices into the world.

What is it that you currently work on? What is your essence? I’d love to hear from you.

Resources

Carol Sanford
Living Systems
Paradigm Shift
John B. WatsonWhat is Behaviorism?
BF Skinner
Human Potential Movement

Support The Podcast

If you enjoy the variety of guests and topics on this show you can help support future productions. October starts my end of year fundraising campaign to begin preparing for 2015. Find out how to make a one time or ongoing monthly contribution at www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/support.

Class Announcements

Jen Mendez at Permiekids.com has a number of interesting educational opportunities coming up. The first of those are her Edge Alliances.

On Sunday, November 9th, from 7 – 8 pm EST, Jen is joined by Marissa Gates, of PermaCognition, to explore how to Cultivate Holistic, Positive Patterns of the Mind.

On Wednesday, November 12th, from 8 – 9 pm EST, Jen is joined by Emiliya Zhivotovskaya and Connie Allen to discuss Everything Gardens: Designing Mind-Body Landscapes.

In addition to the Edge Alliances, Jen is also offering an Educational Design Course to help educators and families design holistic, integrated education plans useful whether you are homeschooling, unschooling, or want to enrich a child’s educational experience when they are not involved in another program or school.

Get In Touch
E-mail: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Phone: 717-827-6266

The Permaculture Podcast with Scott Mann
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Facebook: Facebook.com/ThePermaculturePodcast
Twitter: @permaculturecst

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 Posted by at 11:00