Dec 262014
 
 

Click here to download the episode.

My guest for this episode is the author and environmental activist Derrick Jensen. Some of his books include A Language Older Than Words, The Culture of Make Believe, and the two volume set that introduced me to his work, Endgame.

As with the Dave Jacke interview, this is an intense and open conversation. We talk about the natural world, our role as human beings within it, and the violence that occurs when we become disconnected from that sense of place. We end with how we all have a role in making a difference and caring for Earth; this place that is our home.

If you are familiar with Derrick’s writing this interview takes much the same progression moving in a non-linear fashion that draws together a number of ideas to make a point. The language he uses is often blunt and direct. There is no mincing of words and the conversation can get uncomfortable at times with the frank questions about cultural and societal violence. This is one of the few shows that may not be for everyone, but is worth listening to if you are open to the topics at hand.

Thank you for joining me for this interview. The intensity of what we covered leaves me in a place where I am still examining what he shared in the context of permaculture and creating a better world. This conversation leaves me questioning my role in continuing to participate in the framework of the culture in which I exist. What can I do to lessen my own harm?

We all have a role in doing something positive for life here on Earth. What that is varies so widely that we share the path, but are on our own journeys.

With that, I leave you to consider your own place and what you can do to make a difference. As always, I am here to help you in whatever way I can. Get in touch.

Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Call: 717-827-6266
Write:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

From here the next episode of the show, on December 31st, 2014, discusses the plan for the podcast in 2015. January 7th begins the New Year by looking back over the best of 2014.

May the remainder of this year be bountiful for all of you as you take care of earth, your self, and each other.

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 Posted by at 08:00
Dec 222014
 
 

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My guest for this episode is Dave Jacke a designer from Massachusetts and author, along with Eric Toensmeier, of Edible Forest Gardens Volume 1 and 2. Today he joins us to discuss Ecological Culture Design.

Dave is a returning guest to the show. You can hear about his background and how he came to do this work in his initial interview. If this is your first time listening to Dave I recommend you start there to get a feel for the level of candor you’ll hear in this episode.

This is an open and honest conversation about the four components of Ecological Culture Design:

  • Technology
  • Resources
  • Social and Economic Structures
  • Cosmology

We discuss how we must include these elements in our designs for permaculture systems. These areas matter because these are the pieces we must work with in order to bring the so-called “Invisible Structures” of permaculture to the forefront. Dave and I end the conversation with a constructive critique on what it means to organize, practice, and teach permaculture.

In preparing this episode Dave and I both listened to the audio before it went out on the air and he asked that I correct his statement about Tantric philosophy. In the interview he said, “the perceiver, the perceived and the object of perception are one.” What he meant was “the perceiver, the perceived and the process of perception are one ,” a subtle but big difference.

I agree with much of what Dave has to say in this episode. We cannot keep calling the non-landscape portions of our design invisible, or they will remain there, on the outside, away from view. We need to communicate about them differently in order to understand them and make them a part of our larger designs so that what we do can continue long after our ability to maintain or consult on a system is gone.

For much the same reason the Designers’ Manual only the beginning. Yes, every permaculture designer should have a copy in their library as a reference, and to understand some of the early vision as expressed by Bill Mollison, but in additional to that book we need a large library of materials to reference and cross reference and research to create good designs. With that I would like to see a new edition of the Designers’ Manual written every decade or so as an encyclopedia of permaculture that can include more information about what we’ve learned over the years, but written as a collective cooperative piece by the community that takes the best of what everyone has to offer, and focuses on their areas of specialty, to create a book with multiple perspectives and voices. Get Dave Jacke and Ben Falk to write about formal design, Jude Hobbs and Andrew Millison about permaculture education, Marisha Auerbach and Rachel Kaplan to cover urban permaculture, and Karryn Olson-Ramanujan and Adam Brock on social permaculture. Those are just the names and topics off the top of my head. The Designers’ Manual as written by Mollison is over 500 pages. There’s room for many authors to contribute to such an effort.

If you’d be interested in contributing to something like this, maybe we can get a proposal together and create a new manual for the 21st century.

Whatever your permaculture plans, I’m here to help.
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Call: 717-827-6266
Write:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Resources
Ecological Culture Design: A Holistic View (PDF)
Dave Jacke
Edible Forest Gardens and Permaculture with Dave Jacke (Dave’s first interview on the podcast.)

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 Posted by at 12:00
Dec 172014
 
 

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My guests today are Lee and Dave O’neill of Radical Roots Farm. Radical Roots is a certified organic farm designed and implemented using permaculture principles, as Lee and Dave are both trained permaculture practitioners. With just five acres the O’Neill’s and their five annual interns produce over sixty, yes sixty, thousand pounds of food during the CSA season, as well as tens of thousands of plants, from seed, for their nursery business.

I like interviewing farmers, particularly those engaged in ecological design and permaculture, because there are numerous ways to get started. Lee and Dave began by WWOOFing for numerous years, including on after they got married. My friend Erin Harvey worked at coops and then rented land. Wayne Herring started by borrowing space from family before purchasing. For anyone who wants to farm and do it in a way that benefits earth, there are many different ways to get started. If you’d like to find out more about how the Radical Roots and those beginnings you’ll find the farm, and Lee and Dave, featured in Peter Bane’s The Permaculture Handbook.

Resources
Radical Roots Farm
Radical Roots Apprenticeship
The Permaculture Handbook by Peter Bane
World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms (WWOOF)

PermieKids
I want to thank Jen Mendez at PermieKids.com for support of this podcast and her work on teaching permaculture to children. Two ways she does this are through her Education Design Course and EDGE Alliances.

The Education Design Course (EDC) is a way that you can learn to map a learning landscape to reinvent and redesign what it means to learn, educate, and be educated with children. The next EDC begins on January 9th, 2015.

The next EDGE Alliance is on Saturday January 10th from 12-1pm EST when Kelly Hogan of the Institute of Permaculture Education for Children (IPEC) returns to share how to integrate traditional permaculture learning into the lives of young children and adolescents.

After that, on Sunday January 25th, from 8-9pm EST, Jen focuses on New Year’s Resolutions, specifically the goals and actions we are taking to better care for ourselves, our families, our communities, and the earth.

Find out more about the EDGE Alliances and Education Design Course at PermieKids.com.

The Library Project
A copy of Bryce’s book is being included in the library project. If you haven’t participated already, but would like to be a part of that sign up by sending an email to: librarian@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Support the Podcast
This show is listener supported and over ninety-percent of the income used to keep this show going comes from you, the listener. That includes all the normal basic costs you might expect like equipment and electricity, but also helps with postage for the Traveling Permaculture Library project. This show needs your help to continue growing and expanding. Find out how to make a one time or ongoing monthly contribution at: www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/support.

Get In Touch
E-mail: <a>show@thepermaculturepodcast.com</a>
Phone: 717-827-6266

The Permaculture Podcast with Scott Mann
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Facebook: <a href=”https://www.facebook.com/thepermaculturepodcast” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>Facebook.com/ThePermaculturePodcast</a>
Twitter: <a href=”http://twitter.com/@permaculturecst” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>@permaculturecst</a>
<a href=”https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ-WImuRVXkV5ApSQewGedA”>YouTube</a>

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 Posted by at 08:00
Dec 092014
 
 

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My guest today is Bryce Ruddock, a permaculture practitioner and co-author, along with Wayne Weiseman and Daniel Halsey, of Integrated Forest Gardening.

After speaking with Bryce and reading the book I find him to be a guru on creating functional plant guilds. We talk about that topic as well as how to discover ecological niches and system mimics so that we can adapt our designs to ever changing conditions, whether they arise from climate change, disease, or simply because a chipmunk or raccoon does not like a particular plant.

In this interview I mention natural heritage programs. What I was refer to is a specific program that collects and provides information about important natural resources. These are in cooperation with the Nature Serve network covering Canada, the U.S., and Mexico. The Pennsylvania Heritage site was a go to reference I used repeatedly in my resources management program and is a useful resource for permaculture practitioners. The state specific site for me includes material on local plant communities, inventories at the county level of various plants and animals, species lists for the state, as well as ongoing projects and publications. It is worth looking for this kind of program in your area as the wealth of information is a great for your ongoing research when creating a design. A link to the PA site and NatureServe are in the show notes.

That ongoing research and education is important because we can’t take a Permaculture Design Course and think that is enough. Something one of my teachers imparted on me was that the PDC is just a beginning, our first step. From there we need to develop a niche based on our interests and passions, something David Holmgren recommended, to really know what it is we are doing, to have relevant experience, and be the experts in our areas of interest. In turn we can find people of like mind and take permaculture further. To be able to show examples that work anywhere in the world, and at the same time have the flexibility in our thoughts and a depth of understanding that we can answer questions truthfully. Be willing to say, “I don’t know,” or, “I haven’t done that before,” and a willingness to find a real solution.

Something else Bryce mentioned was building resilience groups. Resilience groups, as presented at Resilience.org, are a way to build connections that coincide nicely with the transition movement. Resilience groups are a broad umbrella under which we can connect with other people on various topics including the transition movement, farm to school initiatives, and the efforts of Interfaith Power and Light. If you are in an area and considering starting a transition group or other organization to create a more bountiful world, definitely look to see if there are any resilience efforts underway in your area.

Resources
Integrated Forest Gardening
Plant Guilds eBook
Pennsylvania Natural Heritage Program
Nature Serve

PermieKids
I want to thank Jen Mendez at PermieKids.com for support of this podcast and her work on teaching permaculture to children. Two ways she does this are through her Education Design Course and EDGE Alliances.

The Education Design Course (EDC) is a way that you can learn to map a learning landscape to reinvent and redesign what it means to learn, educate, and be educated with children. The next EDC begins on January 9th, 2015.

The next EDGE Alliance is on Saturday January 10th from 12-1pm EST when Kelly Hogan of the Institute of Permaculture Education for Children (IPEC) returns to share how to integrate traditional permaculture learning into the lives of young children and adolescents.

After that, on Sunday January 25th, from 8-9pm EST, Jen focuses on New Year’s Resolutions, specifically the goals and actions we are taking to better care for ourselves, our families, our communities, and the earth.

Find out more about the EDGE Alliances and Education Design Course at PermieKids.com.

The Library Project
A copy of Bryce’s book is being included in the library project. If you haven’t participated already, but would like to be a part of that sign up by sending an email to: librarian@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Support the Podcast
This show is listener supported and over ninety-percent of the income used to keep this show going comes from you, the listener. That includes all the normal basic costs you might expect like equipment and electricity, but also helps with postage for the Traveling Permaculture Library project. This show needs your help to continue growing and expanding. Find out how to make a one time or ongoing monthly contribution at: www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/support.

Get In Touch
E-mail: <a>show@thepermaculturepodcast.com</a>
Phone: 717-827-6266

The Permaculture Podcast with Scott Mann
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Facebook: <a href=”https://www.facebook.com/thepermaculturepodcast” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>Facebook.com/ThePermaculturePodcast</a>
Twitter: <a href=”http://twitter.com/@permaculturecst” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>@permaculturecst</a>
<a href=”https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ-WImuRVXkV5ApSQewGedA”>YouTube</a>

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 Posted by at 19:54
Dec 032014
 
 

Click here to download the episode.

My guest for this episode is Craig Sponholtz, a permaculture practitioner who operates Watershed Artisans. One of Craig’s specialties is in building regenerative earthworks to capture water and restore degraded land, which forms the basis for our conversation today.

What I like about this conversation with Craig is the role we have as designers to act as preservers of the land. We can use the design tools presented in permaculture to create solutions that stop erosion with structures built from natural materials that harvest water by slowing it, spreading it, and sinking it, all while keeping that water from cutting through the earth. Craig does this in a way that doesn’t disrupt the natural flow of water, but takes the path into account. For all of the avocation for the use of particular technique, this approach takes us back to observing the landscape first, and deciding on what is most appropriate rather than looking for a one-size fits all solution.

The strategy of water harvesting leads to a number of techniques. Some that Craig mentioned include check dams, one rock dams, rock mulches, and zuni bowls. In the show notes you’ll find a link to a document Craig made, along with Avery Anderson, that explains these techniques in detail, and one other called media luna. I also found a nice piece written by Bill Zeedyk about induced meandering. For those of you who have a copy of Mollison’s Designers’ manual, Chapter 7 Section 3 includes a number of great techniques as well.

Resources
Erosion Control Field Guide by Craig Sponholtz and Avery C. Anderson. This article includes information on Top Down Watershed Restoration including one rock dam, rock mulch, zuni bowl, and media luna techniques.
An Introduction to Induced Meandering by Bill Zeedyk (PDF)

Projects for Children
Grainy: What Kind of Particles Make Up Soil?
Percolating Water: The Movement of Water Beneath the Earth’s Surface
Erosion
Exploring Erostion, Sediment, and Jetties
Eroding Away

Class Announcements
Upcoming EDGE Alliances from Jen Mendez of Permie Kids

  • Friday, December 5th, 2014, from 7 to 9pm Eastern, Jen is holding a K-12 Online Education Program.
  • Saturday, January 10th, 2015, from 12 to 1pm Eastern, Jen is joined by Kelly Hogan from the Institute of Permaculture Education for Children to discuss opportunities for those who want to integrate traditional permaculture learning into the lives of children and adolescents.

The next Education Design Course cohort starts on January 9th, 2015.

Find out more about these and other great opportunities at PermieKids.com.

Support the Podcast
I am in fundraising mode this fall and need your help to get 2015 off to a good start. If you are in a place where you have some financial surplus in your life, please consider making a one time or monthly contribution to the show. Find out how at: <a href=”http://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/support/”>www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/support</a>

Get In Touch
E-mail: <a>show@thepermaculturepodcast.com</a>
Phone: 717-827-6266

The Permaculture Podcast with Scott Mann
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Facebook: <a href=”https://www.facebook.com/thepermaculturepodcast” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>Facebook.com/ThePermaculturePodcast</a>
Twitter: <a href=”http://twitter.com/@permaculturecst” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>@permaculturecst</a>
<a href=”https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ-WImuRVXkV5ApSQewGedA”>YouTube</a>

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 Posted by at 08:00