Dec 172014
 
 

Click here to download the episode.

My guests today are Lee and Dave O’neill of Radical Roots Farm. Radical Roots is a certified organic farm designed and implemented using permaculture principles, as Lee and Dave are both trained permaculture practitioners. With just five acres the O’Neill’s and their five annual interns produce over sixty, yes sixty, thousand pounds of food during the CSA season, as well as tens of thousands of plants, from seed, for their nursery business.

I like interviewing farmers, particularly those engaged in ecological design and permaculture, because there are numerous ways to get started. Lee and Dave began by WWOOFing for numerous years, including on after they got married. My friend Erin Harvey worked at coops and then rented land. Wayne Herring started by borrowing space from family before purchasing. For anyone who wants to farm and do it in a way that benefits earth, there are many different ways to get started. If you’d like to find out more about how the Radical Roots and those beginnings you’ll find the farm, and Lee and Dave, featured in Peter Bane’s The Permaculture Handbook.

Resources
Radical Roots Farm
Radical Roots Apprenticeship
The Permaculture Handbook by Peter Bane
World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms (WWOOF)

PermieKids
I want to thank Jen Mendez at PermieKids.com for support of this podcast and her work on teaching permaculture to children. Two ways she does this are through her Education Design Course and EDGE Alliances.

The Education Design Course (EDC) is a way that you can learn to map a learning landscape to reinvent and redesign what it means to learn, educate, and be educated with children. The next EDC begins on January 9th, 2015.

The next EDGE Alliance is on Saturday January 10th from 12-1pm EST when Kelly Hogan of the Institute of Permaculture Education for Children (IPEC) returns to share how to integrate traditional permaculture learning into the lives of young children and adolescents.

After that, on Sunday January 25th, from 8-9pm EST, Jen focuses on New Year’s Resolutions, specifically the goals and actions we are taking to better care for ourselves, our families, our communities, and the earth.

Find out more about the EDGE Alliances and Education Design Course at PermieKids.com.

The Library Project
A copy of Bryce’s book is being included in the library project. If you haven’t participated already, but would like to be a part of that sign up by sending an email to: librarian@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Support the Podcast
This show is listener supported and over ninety-percent of the income used to keep this show going comes from you, the listener. That includes all the normal basic costs you might expect like equipment and electricity, but also helps with postage for the Traveling Permaculture Library project. This show needs your help to continue growing and expanding. Find out how to make a one time or ongoing monthly contribution at: www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/support.

Get In Touch
E-mail: <a>show@thepermaculturepodcast.com</a>
Phone: 717-827-6266

The Permaculture Podcast with Scott Mann
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Facebook: <a href=”https://www.facebook.com/thepermaculturepodcast” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>Facebook.com/ThePermaculturePodcast</a>
Twitter: <a href=”http://twitter.com/@permaculturecst” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>@permaculturecst</a>
<a href=”https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ-WImuRVXkV5ApSQewGedA”>YouTube</a>

Share
 Posted by at 08:00
Dec 092014
 
 

Click here to download the episode.

My guest today is Bryce Ruddock, a permaculture practitioner and co-author, along with Wayne Weiseman and Daniel Halsey, of Integrated Forest Gardening.

After speaking with Bryce and reading the book I find him to be a guru on creating functional plant guilds. We talk about that topic as well as how to discover ecological niches and system mimics so that we can adapt our designs to ever changing conditions, whether they arise from climate change, disease, or simply because a chipmunk or raccoon does not like a particular plant.

In this interview I mention natural heritage programs. What I was refer to is a specific program that collects and provides information about important natural resources. These are in cooperation with the Nature Serve network covering Canada, the U.S., and Mexico. The Pennsylvania Heritage site was a go to reference I used repeatedly in my resources management program and is a useful resource for permaculture practitioners. The state specific site for me includes material on local plant communities, inventories at the county level of various plants and animals, species lists for the state, as well as ongoing projects and publications. It is worth looking for this kind of program in your area as the wealth of information is a great for your ongoing research when creating a design. A link to the PA site and NatureServe are in the show notes.

That ongoing research and education is important because we can’t take a Permaculture Design Course and think that is enough. Something one of my teachers imparted on me was that the PDC is just a beginning, our first step. From there we need to develop a niche based on our interests and passions, something David Holmgren recommended, to really know what it is we are doing, to have relevant experience, and be the experts in our areas of interest. In turn we can find people of like mind and take permaculture further. To be able to show examples that work anywhere in the world, and at the same time have the flexibility in our thoughts and a depth of understanding that we can answer questions truthfully. Be willing to say, “I don’t know,” or, “I haven’t done that before,” and a willingness to find a real solution.

Something else Bryce mentioned was building resilience groups. Resilience groups, as presented at Resilience.org, are a way to build connections that coincide nicely with the transition movement. Resilience groups are a broad umbrella under which we can connect with other people on various topics including the transition movement, farm to school initiatives, and the efforts of Interfaith Power and Light. If you are in an area and considering starting a transition group or other organization to create a more bountiful world, definitely look to see if there are any resilience efforts underway in your area.

Resources
Integrated Forest Gardening
Plant Guilds eBook
Pennsylvania Natural Heritage Program
Nature Serve

PermieKids
I want to thank Jen Mendez at PermieKids.com for support of this podcast and her work on teaching permaculture to children. Two ways she does this are through her Education Design Course and EDGE Alliances.

The Education Design Course (EDC) is a way that you can learn to map a learning landscape to reinvent and redesign what it means to learn, educate, and be educated with children. The next EDC begins on January 9th, 2015.

The next EDGE Alliance is on Saturday January 10th from 12-1pm EST when Kelly Hogan of the Institute of Permaculture Education for Children (IPEC) returns to share how to integrate traditional permaculture learning into the lives of young children and adolescents.

After that, on Sunday January 25th, from 8-9pm EST, Jen focuses on New Year’s Resolutions, specifically the goals and actions we are taking to better care for ourselves, our families, our communities, and the earth.

Find out more about the EDGE Alliances and Education Design Course at PermieKids.com.

The Library Project
A copy of Bryce’s book is being included in the library project. If you haven’t participated already, but would like to be a part of that sign up by sending an email to: librarian@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Support the Podcast
This show is listener supported and over ninety-percent of the income used to keep this show going comes from you, the listener. That includes all the normal basic costs you might expect like equipment and electricity, but also helps with postage for the Traveling Permaculture Library project. This show needs your help to continue growing and expanding. Find out how to make a one time or ongoing monthly contribution at: www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/support.

Get In Touch
E-mail: <a>show@thepermaculturepodcast.com</a>
Phone: 717-827-6266

The Permaculture Podcast with Scott Mann
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Facebook: <a href=”https://www.facebook.com/thepermaculturepodcast” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>Facebook.com/ThePermaculturePodcast</a>
Twitter: <a href=”http://twitter.com/@permaculturecst” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>@permaculturecst</a>
<a href=”https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ-WImuRVXkV5ApSQewGedA”>YouTube</a>

Share
 Posted by at 19:54
Dec 032014
 
 

Click here to download the episode.

My guest for this episode is Craig Sponholtz, a permaculture practitioner who operates Watershed Artisans. One of Craig’s specialties is in building regenerative earthworks to capture water and restore degraded land, which forms the basis for our conversation today.

What I like about this conversation with Craig is the role we have as designers to act as preservers of the land. We can use the design tools presented in permaculture to create solutions that stop erosion with structures built from natural materials that harvest water by slowing it, spreading it, and sinking it, all while keeping that water from cutting through the earth. Craig does this in a way that doesn’t disrupt the natural flow of water, but takes the path into account. For all of the avocation for the use of particular technique, this approach takes us back to observing the landscape first, and deciding on what is most appropriate rather than looking for a one-size fits all solution.

The strategy of water harvesting leads to a number of techniques. Some that Craig mentioned include check dams, one rock dams, rock mulches, and zuni bowls. In the show notes you’ll find a link to a document Craig made, along with Avery Anderson, that explains these techniques in detail, and one other called media luna. I also found a nice piece written by Bill Zeedyk about induced meandering. For those of you who have a copy of Mollison’s Designers’ manual, Chapter 7 Section 3 includes a number of great techniques as well.

Resources
Erosion Control Field Guide by Craig Sponholtz and Avery C. Anderson. This article includes information on Top Down Watershed Restoration including one rock dam, rock mulch, zuni bowl, and media luna techniques.
An Introduction to Induced Meandering by Bill Zeedyk (PDF)

Projects for Children
Grainy: What Kind of Particles Make Up Soil?
Percolating Water: The Movement of Water Beneath the Earth’s Surface
Erosion
Exploring Erostion, Sediment, and Jetties
Eroding Away

Class Announcements
Upcoming EDGE Alliances from Jen Mendez of Permie Kids

  • Friday, December 5th, 2014, from 7 to 9pm Eastern, Jen is holding a K-12 Online Education Program.
  • Saturday, January 10th, 2015, from 12 to 1pm Eastern, Jen is joined by Kelly Hogan from the Institute of Permaculture Education for Children to discuss opportunities for those who want to integrate traditional permaculture learning into the lives of children and adolescents.

The next Education Design Course cohort starts on January 9th, 2015.

Find out more about these and other great opportunities at PermieKids.com.

Support the Podcast
I am in fundraising mode this fall and need your help to get 2015 off to a good start. If you are in a place where you have some financial surplus in your life, please consider making a one time or monthly contribution to the show. Find out how at: <a href=”http://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/support/”>www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/support</a>

Get In Touch
E-mail: <a>show@thepermaculturepodcast.com</a>
Phone: 717-827-6266

The Permaculture Podcast with Scott Mann
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Facebook: <a href=”https://www.facebook.com/thepermaculturepodcast” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>Facebook.com/ThePermaculturePodcast</a>
Twitter: <a href=”http://twitter.com/@permaculturecst” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>@permaculturecst</a>
<a href=”https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ-WImuRVXkV5ApSQewGedA”>YouTube</a>

Share
 Posted by at 08:00
Nov 242014
 
 

Click here to download the episode.

My guest for this episode is John Arbuckle, a Missouri farmer who is transitioning from grain based pork production to perennial pasture and forage.

John and I discuss talk about his life as a farmer and how he is transitioning away from a grain based diet for his hogs towards developing perennial forages. Familiar with permaculture, he uses tiered priorities to describe his zone model of production, which influences how he interacts with the land. To establish this kind of system John also takes a long view of this work, looking out twenty years in order to reasonably move from the current model to something perennial and permanent.

You can find out more about John and his products at: BaconSnackSticks.com
Singing Prairie Farm (Facebook)

Commentary
Before we get to my commentary, I do want to add that John said to me, after we recorded the interview and were wrapping up, he is trying to get President Obama to pardon one of his turkeys this year for the presidential turkey pardon. If anyone out there has a connection and can help make that happen, I’d really appreciate it.

The first lesson comes from John’s experimentation to see what works and then bolstering his findings with evidence. He saw a problem, found a solution, and is now expanding on it further. This adds to what we know and can use when talking about why permaculture, perennial polycultures, and agroforestry matter. More of this work needs done. Are you currently practicing citizen science and experimenting on matters of permaculture from alternative energy to animal husbandry to landscape techniques?

The other is that we should, as Bill Mollison implores us, take responsibility for our lives and that of our descendants. John reminds us that time is marching on whether we act on our dreams or not. Whether we plant a tree today, tomorrow, or never, time and the world continue with us or without us. I practice permaculture to create the world where I want to live. That world is an abundant one for all life. What world do you want to live in? What are you doing each day to make that world a reality?

Support the Podcast
I am in fundraising mode this fall and need your help to get 2015 off to a good start. If you are in a place where you have some financial surplus in your life, please consider making a one time or monthly contribution to the show. Find out how at: <a href=”http://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/support/”>www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/support</a>

Get In Touch

E-mail: <a>show@thepermaculturepodcast.com</a>
Phone: 717-827-6266

The Permaculture Podcast with Scott Mann
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Facebook: <a href=”https://www.facebook.com/thepermaculturepodcast” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>Facebook.com/ThePermaculturePodcast</a>
Twitter: <a href=”http://twitter.com/@permaculturecst” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>@permaculturecst</a>
<a href=”https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ-WImuRVXkV5ApSQewGedA”>YouTube</a>

Share
 Posted by at 09:00
Nov 182014
 
 

Click here to download the episode.

This episode is the keynote address from Lester Brown delivered at CHABACON 2014, held on October 11th, in Bridgeton, NJ.

The keynote begins with Dr. Michael Edelstein, Director of the Institute for Environmental Studies at Ramapo College of New Jersey. Dr. Edelstein provides an introduction with Mr. Brown’s biography and background and how Lester came to do what he’s doing. Then Mr. Brown takes the stage to discuss the state of agriculture in the world and provides three policies that can address these issues. We then end with a series of audience questions.

 

 

Thank You
I would like to thank Flavia Alaya and Fr. David Rivera for their invitation to cover this event. I’d also like to thank Mr. James Boner and his A/V Club students at Bridgeton High School, Andrea, Angel, and Reggi, for the connection to the sound booth equipment and allowing me to share the space with them for the day.

Thanks also to all the listeners who contribute to the show who make recordings like this possible via their one-time donations or ongoing monthly subscriptions. Find out how at www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/support.

Get In Touch
E-mail: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Phone: 717-827-6266

The Permaculture Podcast with Scott Mann
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Facebook: Facebook.com/ThePermaculturePodcast
Twitter: @permaculturecst
YouTube

Share
 Posted by at 23:48