Apr 232014
 
 

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My guest for this episode is Karryn Olson-Ramanujan, a permaculture teacher, designer, and one of the founders of Finger Lakes Permaculture Institute. This interview is about women in permaculture, and how a pattern language emerges to make the community and movement more inclusive and constructive for everyone interested and involved in building a better world.

The starting point for this conversation was Karryn’s article, which also forms the title for this episode, “A ‘Pattern Language’ for Women in Permaculture.” This powerful piece outlines patterns that provide solutions to create an environment for women’s full participation and leadership in the permaculture community.

The 8 patterns are:

  1. Shift “Mental Models”
  2. Understand and Advocate for the “30% Solution” as a Vital Step Toward Parity
  3. Value Diversity
  4. Intersecting Identities
  5. Mentoring is Key to Building Women’s Leadership
  6. Value Archetypically “Feminine” Ways of Leading
  7. Nurture Women’s Leadership Through Women’s Gatherings
  8. Be an Ally

Find out more about Karryn at her site, seedsustainabilityconsulting.org, and at the Finger Lakes Permaculture Institute.

References and resources from this episode:
Jeanine Carlson-Nelson
Karen Stupski
Timebanking
Margaret Wheatley
WPLI – Women’s Permaculture Leadership Initiative
Women Lead the Way by Linda Tarr-Whelan

Want to add your thoughts to the discussion about women and inclusivity in permaculture? Share them with me:

E-mail: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Phone: 717-827-6266
Facebook: Facebook.com/ThePermaculturePodcast
Twitter: @permaculturecst

The Permaculture Podcast with Scott Mann
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

(Episode: KarrynOlson-Ramanujan)

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 Posted by at 12:00
Apr 212014
 
 

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This episode introduces a project launched, by individuals in cooperation at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, on April 17, 2014, the Open Source Seed Initiative. The plan for this organization is to keep seeds out of the patent, licensing, or other restrictive systems that limit farmers, gardeners, and anyone else using seeds to grow plants.

The full pledge isn’t bound in pages of legal language or incomprehensible jargon. Rather it is a simple paragraph for protecting and sharing seeds with the world.

The Open Source Seed Initiative Pledge

This Open Source Seed pledge is intended to ensure your freedom to use the seed contained herein in any way you choose, and to make sure those freedoms are enjoyed by all subsequent users. By opening this packet, you pledge that you will not restrict others’ use of these seeds and their derivatives by patents, licenses, or any other means. You pledge that if you transfer these seeds or their derivatives they will also be accompanied by this pledge.

Find out more and get involved at:

Opensourceseedinitiative.org

I’d also like to thank Finger Lakes Permaculture Institute for sponsoring this episode.

The Finger Lakes Permaculture Institute invites you to our annual Permaculture Design Certificate course.

Join us this summer (July 25 – August 10, 2014) at our off-grid permaculture learning community in the beautiful Finger Lakes Region of New York.

Immerse yourself in 15 days of instruction by qualified, practicing permaculture teachers at real permaculture sites.

Michael Burns, Rafter Sass Ferguson, Steve Gabriel & Karryn Olson-Ramanujan will lead you through
84 hours of instruction and a rigorous design practicum preparing you to design your own landscapes, homes and projects.

Learn more, watch videos, and follow our blog at: http://FingerLakesPermaculture.org

FOR PODCAST LISTENERS BEFORE MAY 1: Deliver your full payment by May 1st and earn a $200 discount off our full tuition.

Want to add your thoughts to the discussion about seeds, open source, and genetic diversity? Share them with me:

E-mail: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Phone: 717-827-6266
Facebook: Facebook.com/ThePermaculturePodcast
Twitter: @permaculturecst

The Permaculture Podcast with Scott Mann
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

(Episode: 2014Byte0421)

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 Posted by at 12:00
Apr 182014
 
 

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This episode continues the conversation about permaculture, education, and children. The beginning of this show is about Jen Mendez and her work at Permiekids.com to share information and resources for parents who want to include permaculture in a childhood education. Not an interview, but a reflection on a conversation she and I had that discussed her background and work with the community to develop educational material that empowers children of all ages and abilities, and parents, to integrate permaculture into an interest in lifelong exploration and learning.

Find our more about Ms. Mendez and her work at PermieKids.com. You can also hear the interview she recorded with Jack Spirko that got us connected, “Jen Mendez on Permaculture Based Children’s Education

The second portion of the show is further reflections on my role as parent and teacher in my children’s lives. Part of that is more examples of how the children are included in activities. I also offer some of my guiding philosophies regarding how I teach my children. These include supplementing their education with family activities, encouraging their interests not pushing my own, providing opportunities for responsibility, acting as I want them to act (“Do as I do,” rather than, “Do as I say, not as I do.”) I also mention carrying field guides when we’re out and about. You’ll find those, and the influences on my educational perspective, below.

A Selection of My Field Guides
Birds of Pennsylvania by Stan Tekiela
Edible Wild Plants (Eastern/Central North America) by Lee Allen Peterson
Identifying Trees: An All-Season Guide to Eastern North America by Michael D. Williams
The Forager’s Harvest by Sam Thayer
Nature’s Garden by Sam Thayer
A Pocket Guide to Lizards and Turtles of Pennsylvania by Walter Meshaka, Jr. and Joseph T. Collins
A Pocket Guide to Salamanders of Pennsylvania by Walter Meshaka, Jr. and Joseph T. Collins

Education Influences
Earth in Mind by David Orr
Beyond Ecophobia by David Sobel
Place-Based Education by David Sobel
E.D. Hirsch, Jr.
Last Child in the Woods by Richard Louv

I’d also like to thank Finger Lakes Permaculture Institute for sponsoring this episode.

The Finger Lakes Permaculture Institute invites you to our annual Permaculture Design Certificate course.

Join us this summer (July 25 – August 10, 2014) at our off-grid permaculture learning community in the beautiful Finger Lakes Region of New York.

Immerse yourself in 15 days of instruction by qualified, practicing permaculture teachers at real permaculture sites.

Michael Burns, Rafter Sass Ferguson, Steve Gabriel & Karryn Olson-Ramanujan will lead you through
84 hours of instruction and a rigorous design practicum preparing you to design your own landscapes, homes and projects.

Learn more, watch videos, and follow our blog at: http://FingerLakesPermaculture.org

FOR PODCAST LISTENERS BEFORE MAY 1: Deliver your full payment by May 1st and earn a $200 discount off our full tuition.

Want to add your thoughts to the discussion about children and education? Share them with me:

E-mail: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Phone: 717-827-6266
Facebook: Facebook.com/ThePermaculturePodcast
Twitter: @permaculturecst

The Permaculture Podcast with Scott Mann
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

(Episode: 2014Byte0418)

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 Posted by at 12:00
Apr 162014
 
 

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Picture of Karl Steyaert

Karl Steyaert

My guest for this episode is Karl Steyaert, a teacher and practitioner of Nonviolent Communication (NVC). During our conversation, in addition to his biography and background, he shares with us how using NVC can begin the work of restoring our connection with others in a direct, meaningful, productive way that honors our needs while meeting those of others. He also illustrates the process of NVC using an example from his own life. I’m thankful for the open space created during the interview to allow for that discussion.

I first became aware of Nonviolent Communication, and the work of Dr. Marshall Rosenberg when I interviewed my teacher and colleague, Dillon Naber Cruz. Picking up a copy of Dr. Rosenberg’s book, combined with The Four Agreements, changed the way I look at interpersonal relationships and communicating well. Though I’m still learning how to communicate, starting down this road had an incredible impact on my own experience.

NVC and the work of people such as Karl are how we can think differently, act differently, and be different and get out of the thinking we’re currently in. By designing with permaculture and communicating nonviolently we can build a better world for all.

You can find out more about Karl and Nonviolent Communication through these resources:
Karl Steyaert
The Center for Nonviolent Communication (Browse this site for information on training, books, and other resources).

This is part of a planned series on nonviolent communication and restorative justice. If after listening to Karl and the idea of Nonviolent Communication you have thoughts, questions, or comments on these subjects, please let me know.

E-mail: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Phone: 717-827-6266
Facebook: Facebook.com/ThePermaculturePodcast
Twitter: @permaculturecst

The Permaculture Podcast with Scott Mann
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

(Episode: KarlStayaert)

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 Posted by at 12:00
Apr 142014
 
 

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This episode sets out the plan for the podcast moving forward, as well as some of my personal short, medium, and long term goals. After the events over the past few months I want to keep an open dialog about what’s happening behind the scenes, as well as the day-to-day work, so the podcast and permaculture move forward fluidly.

Specific to my current permaculture work that includes fundraising, advertising, the planned release schedule, and collaborations within the community. More personally, I touch on my long term educational goals, taking time to develop my personal body knowledge of certain topics, and plans for bringing together permauclture and higher education.

As my educational perspective is mostly with teenagers, or personal experiences as a parent, if you’re interested in teaching children permaculture, check out Permiekids.com. That site and the work of Jen Mendez are part of the conversation today and forms the basis for the Permabyte for Friday, April 18th.

Want to add your voice to the conversation? Let me know:

E-mail: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Phone: 717-827-6266
Facebook: Facebook.com/ThePermaculturePodcast
Twitter: @permaculturecst

The Permaculture Podcast with Scott Mann
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

(Episode: 2014Short0414)

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Apr 112014
 
 

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Listen to an excerpt from Aldo Leopold‘s A Sand County Almanac. This piece comes from his observations on the month of April and is titled “Come High Water.”

I found Aldo Leopold’s work later in my life, only first hearing of this book last year. His words and turn of phrase are beautiful and inspiring. If you haven’t read it, you really should take the time to do so. Subtle references abound that show the power of observation when combined with a connection to the land. He also expresses the idea of a Land Ethic that is a useful lens for considering human habitation and resource use, the world not built by humanity, and how we can honor our culture and the earth.

If you read A Sand County Almanac or have other nature writing to recommend, I’d love to hear from you:

E-mail: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Phone: 717-827-6266
Facebook: Facebook.com/ThePermaculturePodcast
Twitter: @permaculturecst

The Permaculture Podcast with Scott Mann
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

(Episode: 2014Short0411)

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 Posted by at 12:00
Apr 092014
 
 

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My guest for this episode is Michael Commons, a permaculture practitioner located in Thailand who practices agro-forestry and helps to connect farmers with one another so they can add more value to their farms. We discuss his background, the Thai Agroforestry group Wanakaset, and the NGO organization Michael works for, the Green Net Foundation which also includes the Earth Net organization.

While talking about Wanakaset, we cover the 5 basic needs of the self-sufficient agriculture philosophy in Thailand.

  1. Rice
  2. Food
  3. Medicine
  4. Fertility and Microorganisms
  5. Products We Use Everyday

The conversation around this last item digs into the yields we get from a system and how to add value beyond raw materials. This in turn speaks to economic and personal freedom.

Michael and I are discussing a follow-up interview to discuss savings groups. If you’d like to include a follow-up question with Michael in that conversation, e-mail or call me using the information below.

Learn more about Michael, his thoughts, and work, through the following resources:
E-mail Michael: michael@greennet.or.th
Green Net / Earth Net Foundation
A long term perspective: The Wanakaset concept
How to break through the glass house: A personal reflection

Wanakaset – Journey to Self-Reliance

Feel free to get in touch with me if you have any questions or comments:

E-mail: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Phone: 717-827-6266
Facebook: Facebook.com/ThePermaculturePodcast
Twitter: @permaculturecst

The Permaculture Podcast with Scott Mann
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

(Episode: MichaelCommons)

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 Posted by at 12:00